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close this bookGuidelines for Dengue Surveillance and Mosquito Control, 1995 (WHO, WHO/WPRO; 1995; 112 pages)
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
open this folder and view contents2. VECTOR IDENTIFICATION AND TRANSMISSION OF DF AND DHF
close this folder3. SURVEILLANCE - VECTOR SURVEYS
View the documentLarval surveys
close this folderAdult surveys
View the documentOviposition traps
View the documentPriority areas for Aedes surveillance and control
View the documentDisease surveillance
open this folder and view contents4. CONTROL: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
open this folder and view contents5. CONTROL: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS
open this folder and view contents6. CONTROL: PERSONAL PROTECTION
open this folder and view contents7. CONTROL: SPACE SPRAY APPLICATIONS
open this folder and view contents8. COMMUNITY BASED ACTION
open this folder and view contents9. LEGISLATION
open this folder and view contents10. MANAGING OUTBREAKS
open this folder and view contentsANNEXES
View the documentBACK COVER
 

Oviposition traps

“Ovitraps” provide a sensitive and economical method for detecting the presence of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in situations where the Aedes density is low and general larval surveys produce unsatisfactory results (e.g. when the Breteau Index is < 5).

The standard ovitrap is a wide-mouthed glass jar of approximately 250 ml which is painted black on the outside to attract the Aedes females to oviposit. A piece of hardboard or a wooden paddle is placed diagonally inside the glass as an oviposition substrate. In addition, the jar is partially filled with clean water to provide the right ovipositing medium for the female mosquito (Figure 6). Such jars in the absence of ovipaddles can have white towelling strips placed inside attached by paper clips.

Generally, the ovitraps have proven useful for the early detection of new Aedes infestations in areas where the Aedes mosquitos have not been established previously. Hence, they are extensively used for surveillance at international ports of entry, (airports and seaports) which, according to international sanitary codes, should be maintained free of vector breeding.

Ovitraps can also be used to assess Aedes population fluctuation over a long-term. period especially in epidemiological studies of dengue infection.

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