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close this bookGuidelines for the Treatment of Malaria (WHO; 2006; 266 pages) View the PDF document
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAbbreviations
open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
View the document2. The clinical disease
open this folder and view contents3. Treatment objectives
open this folder and view contents4. Diagnosis of malaria
open this folder and view contents5. Resistance to antimalarial medicines9
open this folder and view contents6. Antimalarial treatment policy
open this folder and view contents7. Treatment of uncomplicated P. Falciparum malaria10
open this folder and view contents8. Treatment of severe falciparum malaria14
open this folder and view contents9. Treatment of malaria caused by P. vivax, P. ovale or P. malariae19
View the document10. Mixed malaria infections
close this folder11. Complex emergencies and epidemics
View the document11.1 Diagnosis
View the document11.2 Use of rapid diagnostic tests in epidemic situations
View the document11.3 Management of uncomplicated malaria in epidemics
View the document11.4 Areas prone to mixed falciparum/vivax malaria epidemics
View the document11.5 Use of gametocytocidal drugs to reduce transmission
View the document11.6 Anti-relapse therapy in vivax malaria epidemics
View the document11.7 Mass treatment
open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
 

11.6 Anti-relapse therapy in vivax malaria epidemics

Anti-relapse therapy for vivax malaria is impractical in most epidemic situations because of the duration of treatment and poor compliance. If adequate records are kept, it can be given in the post-epidemic period to patients who have been treated with blood schizonticides. Primaquine 0.25-0.5 mg base/kg bw daily doses should be given for 14 days, as there is no evidence that shorter courses are effective. Compliance with radical (anti-relapse) treatment is often poor and the drug should ideally be given under supervision, which is very difficult in epidemic situations. Appropriate health education should be provided to assist malaria control and encourage adherence.

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