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close this bookGuidelines for the Treatment of Malaria (WHO; 2006; 266 pages) View the PDF document
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAbbreviations
open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
View the document2. The clinical disease
open this folder and view contents3. Treatment objectives
open this folder and view contents4. Diagnosis of malaria
close this folder5. Resistance to antimalarial medicines9
View the document5.1 Impact of resistance
View the document5.2 Global distribution of resistance
View the document5.3 Assessing resistance
open this folder and view contents6. Antimalarial treatment policy
open this folder and view contents7. Treatment of uncomplicated P. Falciparum malaria10
open this folder and view contents8. Treatment of severe falciparum malaria14
open this folder and view contents9. Treatment of malaria caused by P. vivax, P. ovale or P. malariae19
View the document10. Mixed malaria infections
open this folder and view contents11. Complex emergencies and epidemics
open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
 

5.2 Global distribution of resistance

Resistance to antimalarials has been documented for P. falciparum, P. vivax and, recently, P. malariae.

In P. falciparum, resistance has been observed to almost all currently used antimalarials (amodiaquine, chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine and sulfadoxine- pyrimethamine) except for artemisinin and its derivatives. The geographical distributions and rates of spread have varied considerably.

P. vivax has developed resistance rapidly to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in many areas. Chloroquine resistance is confined largely to Indonesia, East Timor, Papua New Guinea and other parts of Oceania. There are also documented reports

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