Home page  |  About this library  |  Help  |  Clear       English  |  French  |  Spanish  
Expand Document
Expand Chapter
Full TOC
Preferences
to previous section to next section

close this bookScurvy and its Prevention and Control in Major Emergencies (WHO; 1999; 70 pages)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScurvy: definition
open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
close this folderScurvy
close this folderSigns and symptoms
View the documentClassic scurvy
View the documentExperimental scurvy
View the documentMild vitamin C deficiency
View the documentScurvy in pregnant and lactating women and infants
View the documentDiagnosis of scurvy
open this folder and view contentsHistory of scurvy
open this folder and view contentsVitamin C
open this folder and view contentsRecommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
open this folder and view contentsSources of vitamin C
open this folder and view contentsStrategies to prevent scurvy in large refugee populations
View the documentCosts
open this folder and view contentsConclusions and recommendations
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 1
View the documentAnnex 2
View the documentAnnex 3
View the documentBack Cover
 

Mild vitamin C deficiency

Mild vitamin C deficiency can be defined by plasma levels of less than 0.75 mg/dl and a total body vitamin C pool of less than 600 mg (Combs, 1992). The signs are lassitude, fatigue, anorexia, muscular weakness and increased susceptibility to infection. Epidemiological data also show increased risk of ischemic heart disease or hypertension (Combs, 1992). Marginal vitamin C deficiency can be caused by low dietary intakes as well as by factors like smoking, stress, chronic disease, and diabetes that increases the vitamin's turnover in the body.

to previous section to next section

Please provide your feedback   English  |  French  |  Spanish