Home page  |  About this library  |  Help  |  Clear       English  |  French  |  Spanish  
Expand Document
Expand Chapter
Full TOC
Preferences
to previous section to next section

close this bookScurvy and its Prevention and Control in Major Emergencies (WHO; 1999; 70 pages)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScurvy: definition
open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
open this folder and view contentsScurvy
open this folder and view contentsVitamin C
open this folder and view contentsRecommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
open this folder and view contentsSources of vitamin C
close this folderStrategies to prevent scurvy in large refugee populations
View the documentBackground
close this folderMain approaches
open this folder and view contentsDistribution of fresh foods
open this folder and view contentsExchange of rations/extra rations
open this folder and view contentsFortification of relief food
View the documentFortification of cereals
View the documentFortification of sugar
open this folder and view contentsFortification of blended cereal-legume foods (blended foods)
open this folder and view contentsSupplementation
close this folderPromotion of kitchen gardens
View the documentAdvantages
View the documentDisadvantages
View the documentFeasibility
open this folder and view contentsOther options
View the documentCosts
open this folder and view contentsConclusions and recommendations
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 1
View the documentAnnex 2
View the documentAnnex 3
View the documentBack Cover
 
Feasibility

Kitchen gardens were common among refugees from Chad in the Darfur province of Sudan during the drought of 1985-86. Community vegetable gardens in the Salvadoran camps in Honduras provided fresh vegetables to the entire camp population in the late 1980s. In Mesa Grande, 11 000 refugees grew their own fresh vegetables through large, in-camp communal gardens. Many Bhutanese refugees in Nepal grow their own vegetables. However, in large refugee populations in Africa this strategy has not been sufficiently promoted. All too often the norm is that refugees do not/are not able to cultivate to diversify their diets. Availability or provision of enough water for small-scale horticulture as well as for personal use is an important facilitating factor. In particular, growing potatoes, sweet potatoes or other tubers is relatively easy and the product provides energy as well as minerals/vitamins, thus permitting exchange of dry rations (cereals) for other needed commodities.

to previous section to next section

Please provide your feedback   English  |  French  |  Spanish