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close this bookScurvy and its Prevention and Control in Major Emergencies (WHO; 1999; 70 pages)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScurvy: definition
open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
open this folder and view contentsScurvy
open this folder and view contentsVitamin C
open this folder and view contentsRecommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
open this folder and view contentsSources of vitamin C
close this folderStrategies to prevent scurvy in large refugee populations
View the documentBackground
close this folderMain approaches
open this folder and view contentsDistribution of fresh foods
open this folder and view contentsExchange of rations/extra rations
open this folder and view contentsFortification of relief food
View the documentFortification of cereals
View the documentFortification of sugar
open this folder and view contentsFortification of blended cereal-legume foods (blended foods)
open this folder and view contentsSupplementation
open this folder and view contentsPromotion of kitchen gardens
open this folder and view contentsOther options
View the documentCosts
open this folder and view contentsConclusions and recommendations
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 1
View the documentAnnex 2
View the documentAnnex 3
View the documentBack Cover
 

Main approaches

The main approaches to preventing the onset of scurvy in emergency situations affecting large populations are as follows:

• Providing food rations containing adequate amounts of vitamin C by increasing the variety of the food basket and regularly including fresh fruit and vegetables.

• Providing sufficient food in the ration to allow refugees to sell the surplus for other purposes. It has been found that refugees with the highest value of rations received did, in fact, consume the greatest amounts of fruit and vegetables (Hansch, 1992).

• Fortifying current relief commodities with vitamin C, e.g. providing fortified blended cereal-legume food in the general ration in sufficient amounts to cover vitamin C requirements.

• Providing vitamin C supplements in the form of tablets at least weekly.

• Encouraging and facilitating, where feasible, cultivation by refugees of fruits and vegetables in home gardens.

Several of these options have been tried in various refugee settings with varying degrees of success (Berry-Koch et al., 1990). The advantages, disadvantages and feasibility of each approach are discussed below.

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