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close this bookBasic Laboratory Procedures in Clinical Bacteriology (WHO; 1991; 128 pages)
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
open this folder and view contentsQuality assurance in microbiology
close this folderPart I. Bacteriological investigations
open this folder and view contentsBlood
open this folder and view contentsCerebrospinal fluid
open this folder and view contentsUrine
open this folder and view contentsStool
open this folder and view contentsLower respiratory tract infections
open this folder and view contentsUpper respiratory tract infections
open this folder and view contentsSexually transmitted diseases
open this folder and view contentsPurulent exudates, wounds, and abscesses
close this folderAnaerobic bacteriology
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentDescription of bacteria in relation to oxygen requirement
View the documentBacteriology
open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial susceptibility testing
open this folder and view contentsPart II. Essential media and reagents for isolation and identification of clinical pathogens
View the documentSelected further reading
View the documentSelected WHO publications of related interest
View the documentBack Cover
 

Introduction

Previous chapters in this manual have frequently referred to anaerobic bacterial infections and anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacterial infections may occur in virtually any body tissue and at any body site provided that the prevailing conditions are suitable.

The majority of anaerobic bacterial diseases are caused by endogenous bacteria that are part of the normal body flora and that are perfectly compatible with health until something happens to disturb the balance of the normal flora, or to allow the passage of bacteria from one anatomical site to another. Exogenous anaerobic bacteria, primarily Clostridium tetani, C. botulinum, and occasionally C. perfringens and other clostridial species, can gain access through wounds, causing tetanus, wound botulism, or gas gangrene. Abscesses of practically any organ, bacteraemia, peritonitis, thoracic empyema, cellulitis, and appendicitis are just a few conditions in which anaerobic bacteria may play a very significant role in the disease process. It is therefore important that the microbiologist knows when and how to culture for anaerobic bacteria in a given clinical specimen.

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